Help with major contexts

edited September 2011 in TRO General Discussion
This is probably much ado over nothing, but ...

I'm currently going through the online training. I'm up to defining my major contexts. I can only think of two life areas: work and personal. The text of the lesson says you should have three and eight. The reason for the difference (I believe) is that other major contexts I've seen on others, such as "family" and "church" are, in my way of thinking, grouped under personal. 

Is there an advantage to dividing "personal" into smaller contexts?

Comments

  • edited September 2011
    I believe you will see the reasoning when you get to your strategic calendar.  The advantage of splitting tasks up into multiple contexts is to see how you are planning (and spending) your time.  

    Think of contexts as areas of importance.  Having only two areas, and assuming you are working 50 hours a week, and sleeping 56 hours a week, then you have (168hrs/week - 106 = 62)  62 hours of personal time.  That would break down into:
    30% of your time working
    33% of your time sleeping
    37% of your time on personal time

    By splitting personal into personal (something for you), family (something for them & you), and community/church (something for mankind), you can see how you're planning your time at the context level. This breakout gives you a target amount of time for planning those tasks in those areas.  The 37% might become:

      7% personal (11.5 hrs/week)
    20% family (33.6 hrs/week)
    10% community (16.8 hrs/week)

    If you just have one bucket, it is a little harder to measure then if you have separate buckets to measure the important areas of your life.

    Hope this helps.

    Tom


  • Thanks a lot for your response Tom! You're exactly correct.
  • edited September 2011
    Maybe I'll understand it later... Or maybe I'm just too self-absorbed. The only demands on my time I can think of are personal (which still includes family in my way of thinking) and work. There just aren't any tasks that I have that would fall in any other area.

    And for that matter, I only keep track of work tasks on a task list, so why even keep a context?  I'm not trying to be argumentative, but it seems like, for me, it's over-complicating things.
  • Fair enough @tjevans. You can experiment with dividing it up or see if you wish to divide it up later. Good luck!
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